11th April 2013

6.30pm- 8.30pm
Price : €15.00

ADDRESS

The LAB, Dublin City Council Arts Office The Lab Foley Street, Dublin 1

CONTACT

+35318557116
fivelampsartsfestival@gmail.com

WEB

www.fivelampsarts.ie

Share

Poetry Reading with Rita Ann Higgins and Paula Meehan

Ireland Is Changing Mother is the latest collection from Rita Ann Higgins: provocative and heart-warming poems of high jinx, jittery grief and telling social comment by a gutsy, anarchic chronicler of the Irish dispossessed.

“A brilliantly spiky, surreal blend of humour and social issues.”

Ruth Padel, The Independent on Sunday

“Higgins’s voice, forged over 25 years…has a unique fusion of wry, deadpan humour on the one side and absolute sincerity on the other... Now the bubble’s burst, we’re left with our real treasures, and Rita Ann Higgins is one of them.” Fintan O'Toole, The Irish Times

Rita Ann Higgins was born in 1955 in Galway, where she still lives.  She left school at 14, and was in her late 20s when she started writing poetry. She has since published nine books of poetry, including Sunny Side Plucked (1996), which was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and An Awful Racket (2001), both published by Bloodaxe, and Hurting God: Part Essay Part Rhyme (2010) from Salmon Poetry. First published in 2005, her Bloodaxe retrospective Throw in the Vowels: New & Selected Poems was reissued in 2010 with an audio CD of her reading her poems.

Meehan’s Wounded Streets of Dublin -  "Few poets have engaged so convincingly with the complexity of city life, as Paula Meehan". writes Pat Boran

Home: It is not always a charmed place in Meehan's poetry but it is where a great deal of her best work has its originated.

From the title poem of her first book in 1984, Return and No Blame, Meehan has been journeying out and back, increasingly aware of the interplay of cosmic forces in her life (her second book was entitled Reading the Sky)but so often returning to a place where happiness eluded her first-time round as if the orbit of her journey were somehow fated and, therefore, a thing to be accepted. If the Irish word for poem, dán, also means gift, many aspects of the making of poetry are simply givens and the best poets accept them as such.

Poetry Reading with Rita Ann Higgins and Paula Meehan

11th April 2013

6.30pm- 8.30pm
Price : €15.00

ADDRESS

The LAB, Dublin City Council Arts Office The Lab Foley Street, Dublin 1

CONTACT

+35318557116
fivelampsartsfestival@gmail.com

WEB

www.fivelampsarts.ie

Share

Ireland Is Changing Mother is the latest collection from Rita Ann Higgins: provocative and heart-warming poems of high jinx, jittery grief and telling social comment by a gutsy, anarchic chronicler of the Irish dispossessed.

“A brilliantly spiky, surreal blend of humour and social issues.”

Ruth Padel, The Independent on Sunday

“Higgins’s voice, forged over 25 years…has a unique fusion of wry, deadpan humour on the one side and absolute sincerity on the other... Now the bubble’s burst, we’re left with our real treasures, and Rita Ann Higgins is one of them.” Fintan O'Toole, The Irish Times

Rita Ann Higgins was born in 1955 in Galway, where she still lives.  She left school at 14, and was in her late 20s when she started writing poetry. She has since published nine books of poetry, including Sunny Side Plucked (1996), which was a Poetry Book Society Recommendation, and An Awful Racket (2001), both published by Bloodaxe, and Hurting God: Part Essay Part Rhyme (2010) from Salmon Poetry. First published in 2005, her Bloodaxe retrospective Throw in the Vowels: New & Selected Poems was reissued in 2010 with an audio CD of her reading her poems.

Meehan’s Wounded Streets of Dublin -  "Few poets have engaged so convincingly with the complexity of city life, as Paula Meehan". writes Pat Boran

Home: It is not always a charmed place in Meehan's poetry but it is where a great deal of her best work has its originated.

From the title poem of her first book in 1984, Return and No Blame, Meehan has been journeying out and back, increasingly aware of the interplay of cosmic forces in her life (her second book was entitled Reading the Sky)but so often returning to a place where happiness eluded her first-time round as if the orbit of her journey were somehow fated and, therefore, a thing to be accepted. If the Irish word for poem, dán, also means gift, many aspects of the making of poetry are simply givens and the best poets accept them as such.

Elsewhere on visit Dublin