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5th April 2013 – 10th April 2013

Price : Free

CONTACT

Info@blockt.ie

WEB

www.blockt.ie

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Made on Monday III

Location: Block T, Smithfield Square (beside the luas track)

Debora Ando, Olive Barrett, Patricia Brennan, Bob Byrne, Andrew Cassidy, Paola Catizone, Shea Dalton, Vanessa Donoso Lo´pez, David Duff, Gillian Fitzpatrick, Austin Hearne, Brian Hegarty, Jennifer Hickey, Yvonne Higgins, Chris Jones, Barry Kehoe, Maggie Madden, Jonathan Mayhew, Brigid McClean, Se´amus McCormack, Fiona Mulholland, Beth O'Halloran, Aidan O'Sullivan, Jennifer Phelan, Evy Richard, Leda Scully, Joe Stanley, Stephen Taylor, Joan Walker & Yvonne Woods.

Curated by Rowan Sexton

Rather than a thematically driven exhibition, Made on Monday III, takes as it's starting point the artists themselves, and the professional relationships that they hold in common. This exhibition surveys the work of thirty artists, all of whom are involved in the show, by association of working in various capacities at the Irish Museum of Modern Art. Made on Monday III forms part of an ongoing series of exhibitions based on the creative endeavours of collective staff members. Given that IMMA is closed to the public on Monday's, many staff are not scheduled to work on that day, and subsequently spend time in the studio focusing on their individual artistic practices – thereby attributing the logical and witty title, Made on Monday, to the show. This exhibition takes the form of an open submission, in which all staff are eligible to propose work, and is curated by Rowan Sexton, a former member of IMMA staff. It incorporates the work of a diverse group of contemporary artists i n a broad range of disciplines, including ceramics, drawing, installation, painting, photography, print, sculpture and video.

Considering that it is their shared place of employment that unites the artists in this exhibition, it raises issues around artistic practices in general, and more specifically, the sustenance of those practices. Unfortunately, not many creative practitioners are in the favourable position of funding both their practice and lifestyle through the sale of their work. Often artists manage to fund their materials and studio time through the support of grants and bursaries, but more frequently, their supplementary income is derived from a second job – a career to finance their artistic practice. The challenging reality of being an artist is determined by the constant cycle of working to fund their primary interest, obliging the artist to use their studio time as constructively as possible.

Alongside the considerable effort it takes to sustain a career as an artist, the visual arts in general are facing continued obstacles, and both artists and institutions are under increased pressure to manage substantial budget cuts and the wide-ranging impact on their livelihoods. With the country rocked by recession, a dramatically changing societal landscape is emerging, with the demise of numerous businesses a sad reality of the economic downturn. As a consequence, there is an abundance of empty spaces littering the country. Rather than leaving neglected properties to fall into disrepair, enterprising arts groups have begun to explore feasible alternatives that can be employed to alleviate the negative decline. Creative ventures including pop-up projects and one-off events in reclaimed venues are becoming a regular feature in cultural circles. The visual arts have profited from these changed circumstances, and increasingly exhibition and studio spaces are adopting new, n on-traditional locations, such as the exhibition setting itself, Block-T. The exhibition venue provides the surroundings for this large group of artists to showcase dynamic work from their respective practices.The show will highlight a range of individual sensibilities and artistic perspectives, and promises an eclectic, multi-media selection of work from contemporary artists working in Ireland.

Made on Monday III will be officially launched by Sarah Glennie, Director of the Irish Museum of Modern Art, on Friday 5 April 2013 at 6pm.

Made on Monday III

5th April 2013 – 10th April 2013

Price : Free

CONTACT

Info@blockt.ie

WEB

www.blockt.ie

Share

Location: Block T, Smithfield Square (beside the luas track)

Debora Ando, Olive Barrett, Patricia Brennan, Bob Byrne, Andrew Cassidy, Paola Catizone, Shea Dalton, Vanessa Donoso Lo´pez, David Duff, Gillian Fitzpatrick, Austin Hearne, Brian Hegarty, Jennifer Hickey, Yvonne Higgins, Chris Jones, Barry Kehoe, Maggie Madden, Jonathan Mayhew, Brigid McClean, Se´amus McCormack, Fiona Mulholland, Beth O'Halloran, Aidan O'Sullivan, Jennifer Phelan, Evy Richard, Leda Scully, Joe Stanley, Stephen Taylor, Joan Walker & Yvonne Woods.

Curated by Rowan Sexton

Rather than a thematically driven exhibition, Made on Monday III, takes as it's starting point the artists themselves, and the professional relationships that they hold in common. This exhibition surveys the work of thirty artists, all of whom are involved in the show, by association of working in various capacities at the Irish Museum of Modern Art. Made on Monday III forms part of an ongoing series of exhibitions based on the creative endeavours of collective staff members. Given that IMMA is closed to the public on Monday's, many staff are not scheduled to work on that day, and subsequently spend time in the studio focusing on their individual artistic practices – thereby attributing the logical and witty title, Made on Monday, to the show. This exhibition takes the form of an open submission, in which all staff are eligible to propose work, and is curated by Rowan Sexton, a former member of IMMA staff. It incorporates the work of a diverse group of contemporary artists i n a broad range of disciplines, including ceramics, drawing, installation, painting, photography, print, sculpture and video.

Considering that it is their shared place of employment that unites the artists in this exhibition, it raises issues around artistic practices in general, and more specifically, the sustenance of those practices. Unfortunately, not many creative practitioners are in the favourable position of funding both their practice and lifestyle through the sale of their work. Often artists manage to fund their materials and studio time through the support of grants and bursaries, but more frequently, their supplementary income is derived from a second job – a career to finance their artistic practice. The challenging reality of being an artist is determined by the constant cycle of working to fund their primary interest, obliging the artist to use their studio time as constructively as possible.

Alongside the considerable effort it takes to sustain a career as an artist, the visual arts in general are facing continued obstacles, and both artists and institutions are under increased pressure to manage substantial budget cuts and the wide-ranging impact on their livelihoods. With the country rocked by recession, a dramatically changing societal landscape is emerging, with the demise of numerous businesses a sad reality of the economic downturn. As a consequence, there is an abundance of empty spaces littering the country. Rather than leaving neglected properties to fall into disrepair, enterprising arts groups have begun to explore feasible alternatives that can be employed to alleviate the negative decline. Creative ventures including pop-up projects and one-off events in reclaimed venues are becoming a regular feature in cultural circles. The visual arts have profited from these changed circumstances, and increasingly exhibition and studio spaces are adopting new, n on-traditional locations, such as the exhibition setting itself, Block-T. The exhibition venue provides the surroundings for this large group of artists to showcase dynamic work from their respective practices.The show will highlight a range of individual sensibilities and artistic perspectives, and promises an eclectic, multi-media selection of work from contemporary artists working in Ireland.

Made on Monday III will be officially launched by Sarah Glennie, Director of the Irish Museum of Modern Art, on Friday 5 April 2013 at 6pm.

Elsewhere on visit Dublin