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23rd July 2012 – 18th November 2012

Price : Free

ADDRESS

National Gallery of Ireland, Merrion Square West, Dublin 2

CONTACT

+353 1 661 5133
info@ngi.ie

WEB

www.nationalgallery.ie/

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Real Life? Hogarth’s images of love, death and family

Real Life? Hogarth’s images of love, death and family
National Gallery of Ireland, Millennium Wing
23 July – 18 November 2012
Admission Free


William Hogarth (1697-1764) was a successful painter, printmaker and satirist. The four paintings and ten prints on display in this exhibition illustrate the contrast between the awful realities of life shown in his popular print series on moral subjects, and ideal family life as depicted in the gracious family portraits he did on commission. The full set of four ‘Cruelty’ prints (1751) are complemented by single prints from The Harlot’s Progress (1732) and The Rake’s Progress (1735). The scandalous scene depicted in his oil The Denunciation (1729) contrasts with the happiness and innocence of childhood portrayed in his portrait of the Mackinen children painted in the 1740s.
 

Real Life? Hogarth’s images of love, death and family

23rd July 2012 – 18th November 2012

Price : Free

ADDRESS

National Gallery of Ireland, Merrion Square West, Dublin 2

CONTACT

+353 1 661 5133
info@ngi.ie

WEB

www.nationalgallery.ie/

Share

Real Life? Hogarth’s images of love, death and family
National Gallery of Ireland, Millennium Wing
23 July – 18 November 2012
Admission Free


William Hogarth (1697-1764) was a successful painter, printmaker and satirist. The four paintings and ten prints on display in this exhibition illustrate the contrast between the awful realities of life shown in his popular print series on moral subjects, and ideal family life as depicted in the gracious family portraits he did on commission. The full set of four ‘Cruelty’ prints (1751) are complemented by single prints from The Harlot’s Progress (1732) and The Rake’s Progress (1735). The scandalous scene depicted in his oil The Denunciation (1729) contrasts with the happiness and innocence of childhood portrayed in his portrait of the Mackinen children painted in the 1740s.
 

Elsewhere on visit Dublin