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14th March 2013 – 20th April 2013

10.00am - 5.00pm
Price : Free

ADDRESS

The LAB, Dublin City Council Arts Office The Lab Foley Street, Dublin 1

CONTACT

+35312227845

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Exiles

A group show curated by Alison Pilkington

Rhona Byrne, Mark Garry, James Hanley, Stephen Loughman, Ronan McCrea, Ruby Wallis.

As part of the Five Lamps Arts Festival theme commemorating the centenary of the Dublin Lockout of 1913 artist Alison Pilkington has brought together a diverse group of artists to consider the idea of being 'locked out' as a metaphor for the human condition.

The title of the show "Exiles" alludes to a form of self imposed "lock out" but also refers to a state of existence apart from ones home or perhaps, oneself. Another curatorial inspiration for the exhibition was the words of the poet Arthur Rimbauld. Rhona Byrne's audio piece explores changing perceptions of self body and personal experience relation to space by listing object or situational phobia. The work addresses the complexities and subjectivity of our special lives and how anxiety and fear can alter perceptions of place. 

Exiles

14th March 2013 – 20th April 2013

10.00am - 5.00pm
Price : Free

ADDRESS

The LAB, Dublin City Council Arts Office The Lab Foley Street, Dublin 1

CONTACT

+35312227845

Share

A group show curated by Alison Pilkington

Rhona Byrne, Mark Garry, James Hanley, Stephen Loughman, Ronan McCrea, Ruby Wallis.

As part of the Five Lamps Arts Festival theme commemorating the centenary of the Dublin Lockout of 1913 artist Alison Pilkington has brought together a diverse group of artists to consider the idea of being 'locked out' as a metaphor for the human condition.

The title of the show "Exiles" alludes to a form of self imposed "lock out" but also refers to a state of existence apart from ones home or perhaps, oneself. Another curatorial inspiration for the exhibition was the words of the poet Arthur Rimbauld. Rhona Byrne's audio piece explores changing perceptions of self body and personal experience relation to space by listing object or situational phobia. The work addresses the complexities and subjectivity of our special lives and how anxiety and fear can alter perceptions of place. 

Elsewhere on visit Dublin