Recommended for you:

25th April 2013

8.00pm
Price : €25.00- €60.00

ADDRESS

National Concert Hall, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2

CONTACT

+35314170000
info@nch.ie

WEB

www.nch.ie

Share

Academy of Ancient Music; Richard Egarr, conductor/forte piano; Angelika Kirchschlager, mezzo sopran

As part of the Great Artists Series in The International Concert Series 2012-2013

Mozart Symphony No. 31 in D major, K297 Paris

Mozart Liederen

Haydn Scena di Berenice

Haydn Arianna a Naxos

Haydn Piano Concerto in D major

Mozart Alma grande e nobil core, K578

Mozart Al desio di chi t'adora, K577

Austrian mezzo-soprano Angelika Kirchschlager enjoys an international career as one of the most important vocal artists before the public today dividing her time between recitals and opera in Europe, North America and the Far East. She is internationally recognized as one of the foremost interpreters of Richard Strauss and Mozart.

Born in Salzburg, Angelika Kirchschlager studied piano at the Mozarteum. Upon graduation from the ‘Musisches Gymnasium” in Salzburg, she enrolled at the Vienna Music Academy in 1984 where she studied voice with Professor Gerhard Kahry and the late Viennese baritone Walter Berry.

Highlights of her 2011-2012 season included various concert and recital engagements in Europe, North and South America and a new production of Weill’s Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny at the Vienna State Opera.

Back in 1973, most orchestras played old music in a modern style. Centuries of change had eroded the sound-worlds known to Bach, Handel, Haydn and Mozart: the instruments were different; the pitch was different; the number of players was different; the very essence and spirit of performances was different. But change was in the air. Wouldn’t it be great, people asked, if we could turn the clock back; if we could find out more about composers’ original intentions and get closer to the style in which music was originally performed.

This was the spirit in which Christopher Hogwood founded the AAM. Centuries of convention were cut away as baroque and classical masterworks were heard anew. Music lovers worldwide were electrified. Ancient music got a thrilling new lease of life. The stringed instruments in Hogwood’s new orchestra had strings made of animal gut, not steel. The trumpets had no valves. The violins and violas didn’t have chin rests, and the cellists gripped their instruments between their legs rather than resting them on the floor.

The AAM's Music Director Richard Egarr is a brilliant harpsichordist and equally skilled on the organ, fortepiano and modern piano. He is also an accomplished conductor, and relishes the chance to talk about music at every opportunity.

Since being appointed Music Director of the AAM in 2006, Richard has directed the orchestra in concerts around the world and in a number of acclaimed recordings. Richard is also involved with numerous other period ensembles in America and the UK.

Presented by The National Concert Hall           

Academy of Ancient Music; Richard Egarr, conductor/forte piano; Angelika Kirchschlager, mezzo sopran

25th April 2013

8.00pm
Price : €25.00- €60.00

ADDRESS

National Concert Hall, Earlsfort Terrace, Dublin 2

CONTACT

+35314170000
info@nch.ie

WEB

www.nch.ie

Share

As part of the Great Artists Series in The International Concert Series 2012-2013

Mozart Symphony No. 31 in D major, K297 Paris

Mozart Liederen

Haydn Scena di Berenice

Haydn Arianna a Naxos

Haydn Piano Concerto in D major

Mozart Alma grande e nobil core, K578

Mozart Al desio di chi t'adora, K577

Austrian mezzo-soprano Angelika Kirchschlager enjoys an international career as one of the most important vocal artists before the public today dividing her time between recitals and opera in Europe, North America and the Far East. She is internationally recognized as one of the foremost interpreters of Richard Strauss and Mozart.

Born in Salzburg, Angelika Kirchschlager studied piano at the Mozarteum. Upon graduation from the ‘Musisches Gymnasium” in Salzburg, she enrolled at the Vienna Music Academy in 1984 where she studied voice with Professor Gerhard Kahry and the late Viennese baritone Walter Berry.

Highlights of her 2011-2012 season included various concert and recital engagements in Europe, North and South America and a new production of Weill’s Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny at the Vienna State Opera.

Back in 1973, most orchestras played old music in a modern style. Centuries of change had eroded the sound-worlds known to Bach, Handel, Haydn and Mozart: the instruments were different; the pitch was different; the number of players was different; the very essence and spirit of performances was different. But change was in the air. Wouldn’t it be great, people asked, if we could turn the clock back; if we could find out more about composers’ original intentions and get closer to the style in which music was originally performed.

This was the spirit in which Christopher Hogwood founded the AAM. Centuries of convention were cut away as baroque and classical masterworks were heard anew. Music lovers worldwide were electrified. Ancient music got a thrilling new lease of life. The stringed instruments in Hogwood’s new orchestra had strings made of animal gut, not steel. The trumpets had no valves. The violins and violas didn’t have chin rests, and the cellists gripped their instruments between their legs rather than resting them on the floor.

The AAM's Music Director Richard Egarr is a brilliant harpsichordist and equally skilled on the organ, fortepiano and modern piano. He is also an accomplished conductor, and relishes the chance to talk about music at every opportunity.

Since being appointed Music Director of the AAM in 2006, Richard has directed the orchestra in concerts around the world and in a number of acclaimed recordings. Richard is also involved with numerous other period ensembles in America and the UK.

Presented by The National Concert Hall           

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