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Spanning Custom House Quay to City Quay , Dublin 2

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Sean O'Casey Bridge

The Sean O’Casey Bridge, has won a major international engineering award. The bridge, which was commissioned by the Docklands Authority, won the Best Pedestrian Bridge at the International IStructE Awards run by the UK ’s Institute of Structural Engineers .

Opened in mid-2005, the Sean O’Casey Bridge links the north and south Docklands, and has become an instant landmark on the River Liffey. The bridge has even featured in advertisements for O2, the Ryder Cup and, most recently for Guinness.

The design features a pioneering ‘swing’ action that sees the two leaves or arms of the bridge open to allow boats pass up and down the River Liffey. Each ‘leaf’ of the bridge is approximately 44 metres long and 4.5 metres wide and weighs around 160 tonnes. Each bridge leaf is a balanced cantilever and is designed to rotate on a central bearing supported on granite clad piers in the River Liffey. The piers are founded on four piles bored over 12 metres into the bedrock.



Sean O'Casey Bridge

ADDRESS

Spanning Custom House Quay to City Quay , Dublin 2

CONTACT

Share

The Sean O’Casey Bridge, has won a major international engineering award. The bridge, which was commissioned by the Docklands Authority, won the Best Pedestrian Bridge at the International IStructE Awards run by the UK ’s Institute of Structural Engineers .

Opened in mid-2005, the Sean O’Casey Bridge links the north and south Docklands, and has become an instant landmark on the River Liffey. The bridge has even featured in advertisements for O2, the Ryder Cup and, most recently for Guinness.

The design features a pioneering ‘swing’ action that sees the two leaves or arms of the bridge open to allow boats pass up and down the River Liffey. Each ‘leaf’ of the bridge is approximately 44 metres long and 4.5 metres wide and weighs around 160 tonnes. Each bridge leaf is a balanced cantilever and is designed to rotate on a central bearing supported on granite clad piers in the River Liffey. The piers are founded on four piles bored over 12 metres into the bedrock.



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