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Dublin Georgian Doors

It was in the 18th century that Dublin acquired this beautiful and distinctive style of architecture - Georgian. Dublin Georgian architecture is so called as this was a style that was developed during a historic period from 1714 to 1830. Four King George’s reigned in this period, hence the adaption of the name Georgian Dublin.

The Georgian door is a well recognized symbol of ‘Welcome’ in Dublin and probably the most commonly known element of the style. Dublin is abundant with colourful Georgian doors and many still survive with their polished brass fittings. The vibrant colours used on the doors was to add some individual flair and to counteract the strict architectural rules of the style. Although the Georgian Door can be seen throughout the city the best examples can be seen on the sweeping terraces of houses in areas such as Baggot Street and Leeson Street as well as Merrion Square and Mountjoy Square.

It is said that in order to set themselves apart, the former residents of Georgian Dublin painted their front doors whatever color they fancied, added ornate knockers, elegant fanlights above the door, and wrought iron boot scrapers near the entrance.

The exterior architecture of the Georgian style can be readily seen throughout the city and you can also view the creative skills of the craftsmen who shaped the interiors. Rich and elaborate plasterwork, outstanding woodwork, beautiful marble fireplaces and graceful staircases were feature of both great and modest Georgian homes. The James Joyce Centre on North Great George’s Street, Newman House and the Dublin Writer’s Museum are just some of the visitor attractions that are open to the public and housed in beautifully restored past Georgian residences.

Find out more about Georgian Dublin with our Georgian Insider Guide

 



Dublin Georgian Doors

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It was in the 18th century that Dublin acquired this beautiful and distinctive style of architecture - Georgian. Dublin Georgian architecture is so called as this was a style that was developed during a historic period from 1714 to 1830. Four King George’s reigned in this period, hence the adaption of the name Georgian Dublin.

The Georgian door is a well recognized symbol of ‘Welcome’ in Dublin and probably the most commonly known element of the style. Dublin is abundant with colourful Georgian doors and many still survive with their polished brass fittings. The vibrant colours used on the doors was to add some individual flair and to counteract the strict architectural rules of the style. Although the Georgian Door can be seen throughout the city the best examples can be seen on the sweeping terraces of houses in areas such as Baggot Street and Leeson Street as well as Merrion Square and Mountjoy Square.

It is said that in order to set themselves apart, the former residents of Georgian Dublin painted their front doors whatever color they fancied, added ornate knockers, elegant fanlights above the door, and wrought iron boot scrapers near the entrance.

The exterior architecture of the Georgian style can be readily seen throughout the city and you can also view the creative skills of the craftsmen who shaped the interiors. Rich and elaborate plasterwork, outstanding woodwork, beautiful marble fireplaces and graceful staircases were feature of both great and modest Georgian homes. The James Joyce Centre on North Great George’s Street, Newman House and the Dublin Writer’s Museum are just some of the visitor attractions that are open to the public and housed in beautifully restored past Georgian residences.

Find out more about Georgian Dublin with our Georgian Insider Guide

 



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