ADDRESS

Dun Laoghaire, Dublin

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Peoples Park

The People's Park is near Dun Laoghaire town centre, between Glasthule and the Seafront. It is approximately 2 hectares in extent. It was developed by the then Kingstown Town Commissioners towards the end of the 19th century in the formal Victorian style. It was enclosed by wrought iron railings and gates with the most prominent entrances off George's Street and Queen's Road.

The park is the host of the wonderful CoCo Markets every Sunday and many festivals and events throughout the year

It was laid out with a system of pedestrian pathways, seats, bandstand, viewing shelter and two very fine cast iron fountains manufactured by the Sun Foundry, Glasgow.

The Park was officially opened to the public on September 29th 1890 by its designer Mr. J.L. Robinson C.E. A.R.H.A., Chairman of the Kingstown Town Commissioners. It appears that the development works were carried out mainly within that year. The Kingstown Town Commissioners acquired the property, which was a Board of Works quarry, in 1889 and obtained a Local Government Board loan of £4,000 to develop the park.

Mr. J.L. Robinson, a prominent architect, became Chairman of the Town Commissioners in 1889. He also designed the Dun Laoghaire Post Office (now part of the County Hall), completed by 1879, St. Michael's Hospital (1874), the spire of St. Michael's Church (1892), and the Town Hall, completed in 1885.

There was a Martello tower on the site, built in 1805 as part of defences against a possible Napoleonic invasion. This is shown on plans for the proposed pier in 1817 and is featured on the cover of William Duncan's survey of the County of Dublin 1821. The original layout of the park shows a pedestrian path system somewhat more formal and cruciform than the current one. The latter, more complex path layout appeared by 1937.



Peoples Park

ADDRESS

Dun Laoghaire, Dublin

CONTACT

Share

The People's Park is near Dun Laoghaire town centre, between Glasthule and the Seafront. It is approximately 2 hectares in extent. It was developed by the then Kingstown Town Commissioners towards the end of the 19th century in the formal Victorian style. It was enclosed by wrought iron railings and gates with the most prominent entrances off George's Street and Queen's Road.

The park is the host of the wonderful CoCo Markets every Sunday and many festivals and events throughout the year

It was laid out with a system of pedestrian pathways, seats, bandstand, viewing shelter and two very fine cast iron fountains manufactured by the Sun Foundry, Glasgow.

The Park was officially opened to the public on September 29th 1890 by its designer Mr. J.L. Robinson C.E. A.R.H.A., Chairman of the Kingstown Town Commissioners. It appears that the development works were carried out mainly within that year. The Kingstown Town Commissioners acquired the property, which was a Board of Works quarry, in 1889 and obtained a Local Government Board loan of £4,000 to develop the park.

Mr. J.L. Robinson, a prominent architect, became Chairman of the Town Commissioners in 1889. He also designed the Dun Laoghaire Post Office (now part of the County Hall), completed by 1879, St. Michael's Hospital (1874), the spire of St. Michael's Church (1892), and the Town Hall, completed in 1885.

There was a Martello tower on the site, built in 1805 as part of defences against a possible Napoleonic invasion. This is shown on plans for the proposed pier in 1817 and is featured on the cover of William Duncan's survey of the County of Dublin 1821. The original layout of the park shows a pedestrian path system somewhat more formal and cruciform than the current one. The latter, more complex path layout appeared by 1937.



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