ADDRESS

28 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8

CONTACT

+353 1 6776097
ryans@fxbuckley.ie

WEB

http://ryans.fxbuckley.ie/

Share

Ryan's of Parkgate Street

Ryan’s of Parkgate Street has been a landmark Victorian public house in Dublin since 1886 located at the front gate of the Phoenix Park. It has had many famous patrons thorughout it's years including George W. Bush Junior and Senior who both drank here together and also John F. Kennedy.

Ryan's Victorian Features:

The Snug

The function of snugs in Irish pubs throughout the 1900's was for ladies to frequent, as it was frowned upon to have ladies in the bar, and they were to be kept seperate from the men so that the women weren't seen. The snugs are completely seperated from the rest of the pub with it's own door and lock inside. It has it's own bell for when you want to order a drink with a hatch for the barman to pass your drink in. The snugs also have frosted glass and mirrors on the doors so that you had ultimate privacy. The snug was also used by patrons who preferred not to be seen in the public bar, the local police officer would pop in for a quiet pint, the parish priest for his evening whisky, and courting couples. Ryan's of Parkgate Street used to have four snugs but two of them were removed by previous owners in the late 1990's. The two snugs that still stand are listed with Dublin City Council.

The Clock

Our Clock is the oldest two faced indoor clock in Ireland. It came from the Frengley Brothers German Clock Company in the late 1800's. Ironically it was bought in FXBuckley Grill Crow Street which used to be a clock shop. Ryan's bar was designed around the clock in 1886 and today it is still the main feature of the Bar. Historically, Willie 'Bongo' Ryan set the clock 5 minutes fast, so that his patrons wouldn't miss their train from Heuston Station. The clock is still tick tocking today.....once we remember to wind it that is!!

The Drawers

In Victorian Times public houses were merchants of whiskey, tobacco and tea & these are the original drawers from 1886 used to store the tobacco and tea in Ryans of Parkgate Street.

The Cigarette Match Strikers

These metal grates were used to strike matches since the late 1800's they are integrated along the bar counter the whole way round the pub for men to light their cigarettes, pipes & cigars.

The Gas Lamps

The original Gas Lamps are still standing in Ryans bar today, they have since been converted over to electricity but they are still one of the main features of the bar.

Similar to that of The Phoenix Park which was one of the first places in the city to have the old gas lighting. All the lanterns were retained and converted over to electricity but in recent times some were converted back to gas lighting and give the visitor a real sense of lighting from the 19th century.

The Whiskey Barrels

Dublin Victorian Pubs used to buy cask strength whiskey (70%) from Jameson & Powers distillery. The barmen had the skill of diluting it to 40% using copper measuring jugs. Ryan's of Parkgate Street had it's own Powers labelled bottle in which we still have a few today.

Patrons used to return with their bottles for a refill for home consumption.



Ryan's of Parkgate Street

ADDRESS

28 Parkgate Street, Dublin 8

CONTACT

+353 1 6776097
ryans@fxbuckley.ie

WEB

http://ryans.fxbuckley.ie/

Share

Ryan’s of Parkgate Street has been a landmark Victorian public house in Dublin since 1886 located at the front gate of the Phoenix Park. It has had many famous patrons thorughout it's years including George W. Bush Junior and Senior who both drank here together and also John F. Kennedy.

Ryan's Victorian Features:

The Snug

The function of snugs in Irish pubs throughout the 1900's was for ladies to frequent, as it was frowned upon to have ladies in the bar, and they were to be kept seperate from the men so that the women weren't seen. The snugs are completely seperated from the rest of the pub with it's own door and lock inside. It has it's own bell for when you want to order a drink with a hatch for the barman to pass your drink in. The snugs also have frosted glass and mirrors on the doors so that you had ultimate privacy. The snug was also used by patrons who preferred not to be seen in the public bar, the local police officer would pop in for a quiet pint, the parish priest for his evening whisky, and courting couples. Ryan's of Parkgate Street used to have four snugs but two of them were removed by previous owners in the late 1990's. The two snugs that still stand are listed with Dublin City Council.

The Clock

Our Clock is the oldest two faced indoor clock in Ireland. It came from the Frengley Brothers German Clock Company in the late 1800's. Ironically it was bought in FXBuckley Grill Crow Street which used to be a clock shop. Ryan's bar was designed around the clock in 1886 and today it is still the main feature of the Bar. Historically, Willie 'Bongo' Ryan set the clock 5 minutes fast, so that his patrons wouldn't miss their train from Heuston Station. The clock is still tick tocking today.....once we remember to wind it that is!!

The Drawers

In Victorian Times public houses were merchants of whiskey, tobacco and tea & these are the original drawers from 1886 used to store the tobacco and tea in Ryans of Parkgate Street.

The Cigarette Match Strikers

These metal grates were used to strike matches since the late 1800's they are integrated along the bar counter the whole way round the pub for men to light their cigarettes, pipes & cigars.

The Gas Lamps

The original Gas Lamps are still standing in Ryans bar today, they have since been converted over to electricity but they are still one of the main features of the bar.

Similar to that of The Phoenix Park which was one of the first places in the city to have the old gas lighting. All the lanterns were retained and converted over to electricity but in recent times some were converted back to gas lighting and give the visitor a real sense of lighting from the 19th century.

The Whiskey Barrels

Dublin Victorian Pubs used to buy cask strength whiskey (70%) from Jameson & Powers distillery. The barmen had the skill of diluting it to 40% using copper measuring jugs. Ryan's of Parkgate Street had it's own Powers labelled bottle in which we still have a few today.

Patrons used to return with their bottles for a refill for home consumption.



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